Genealogy #OffTheGrid

Define A Good Resource Book

If I were to say to you, I have a good book for you to read, what would be your response? The most likely reaction would be what is in the book, right? Determining a “good” book is not judged by its cover. But by the reception of the content and feedback to others. We all express our opinions openly at different points and times by public reviews or during a personal conversation. The contents of any book are equivalent to the ultimate prize inside. So, why is it that older books automatically retain a reputation with labels such as out-of-date or not in touch with reality? This realm of thinking is more common than one may realize. I own many books ranging in publication dates from 1711 to the present-day. The majority of these are not recent works but rather specific to a particular subject, time, and place. No difference matters for me when the book was written or published. My main objective is to look for unknown material, detailed facts to further my research. With modern works, I want to distinguish between a personal association with the material and the author. Writing a book is no easy task, and I applaud all authors through the centuries of published works. But with present-day publications, I want to know if real passion from the author is relevant to my own craving. Viewing the words is not enough. Reading with feelings of exploration, excitement, and a yearning for more provides a satisfying overall view. Why do you ask? The author’s research and dedication define the works of the book.

Piedmont Trails Library (click on photo above)

Pictured above is the link to the Piedmont Trails library filled with hundreds of fascinating books that I treasure deeply. I have collected books throughout my life as a kid with my autobiography of Laura Ingalls Wilder to an adult with the novel John Adams by McCullough. They primarily range from non-fiction historical to genealogical material with mixtures of Atlas books, family lineage, and archaeology. I am continuing to add my collection to the shared link in hopes of uploading all of my treasures online. I encourage everyone to follow this same process of sharing their books. My personal favorites include prestige authors such as David McCullough, Ron Chernow, Leo Tolstoy, Paul Johnson, James McPherson, Alex Haley, Merrill Jensen, and so many others.

The online version of the library represents two extensive elements concerning Piedmont Trails. The first, bringing awareness to the books I have on hand, and the second, offering the material to all of you. Contact Piedmont Trails with the book information you are interested in, and submit a lookup request with details of the material you seek. Our journey may differ from one person to another, but our resources, in many cases, all derive from basically the same format.

A good book is hard to put down. Our attention spans the pages as if starring into a mystical mist of wonder, and suddenly with each word, the pages reveal their secrets. Our ancestors lived incredible lives, and if we each could capture just one breathtaking moment in time to write about it and share it with everyone, what a wonderful world it would be. A precious gift from the past meeting the present secured for the future. That is a true definition of a good book, my friend. Enjoy Your Journey To The Past !!

1 reply »

  1. The more resources the book has listed, the more I like the book. Index is also a very important element. I have obtained so many details over the years from individual pages from a specific book with resource listed. Little to unknown facts disappear over time and this is crucial in moving forward with our genealogy records and historical materials.

    Like

Leave a Reply

Please log in using one of these methods to post your comment:

WordPress.com Logo

You are commenting using your WordPress.com account. Log Out /  Change )

Google photo

You are commenting using your Google account. Log Out /  Change )

Twitter picture

You are commenting using your Twitter account. Log Out /  Change )

Facebook photo

You are commenting using your Facebook account. Log Out /  Change )

Connecting to %s